Making a difference (large or small) in people's lives

 

AUKC Case Study – Client MP

Client MP

MP was referred to Age UK Croydon for support to deal with outstanding paperwork as she had recently been in hospital and since returning home had been unable to manage it.  She also had mobility issues and was unable to manage the stairs or keep the house maintained and wanted to move into more suitable accommodation.  She had no close family or friends.

We worked with her to sort through and deal with the paperwork and once she felt able to, helped her to identify supported housing, accompanied her to view the property

and complete all necessary paperwork.

Once moved, we helped her deal with the paperwork related to moving, including notifying people of her change of address, cancelling/setting up Direct Debits, Standing

Once she had settled, she needed ongoing help to manage her day to day paperwork and a volunteer now visits her regularly to help with this.  This also means that she has a regular visit from someone which reduces her feelings of isolation. Orders, finding a new GP and other necessary services.

 

Time for me to say Good Knight!

The chap I want to tell you about doesn’t wear shining armor and charge about the place on a trusty, snorting steed. But he’s still my white knight. He comes in the shape of a genial and gentle man who for some years now has put heart and soul into helping me. He’s from Age UK in Croydon, Surrey and I want to tell you how much he (through that splendid outfit) has done for me.

When you get quite old like me – I’m 73, a chronic lung disorder patient, fairly disabled and living in sheltered accommodation – you really do need all the help you can get. I’ve had that in abundance We get quite frightened sometimes, you know – people aren’t always kind to us old fogeys. I am lucky I have a family who are kind and supportive and visit me frequently. But sometimes you need professional help too, and as I’ve told you, I had that from Age UK.

One of the most valuable ways I’ve been helped is by being steered through an almighty minefield of finance and paperwork, a system so complex at times, it is tricky for some of the administrators to get to grips with. Various allowance forms can be a nightmare for older people and Age UK can help preserve your sanity.

If you think that I have told you a bit of a tale of woe, then I apologise – that certainly wasn’t my intention. My main aim is to say a huge thank you to Age UK (and to Brian Calvert in particular). That really is thanks from the bottom of my heart. That, I think, is a message of hope.

Finally, to return to my original theme, keep those lances and pikestaffs shiny, good soldiers, ready for the battles ahead.

Mr L E