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Author: Age Cymru
Published on 09 June 2015 11:00 AM

 

Graeme Francis, Head of Policy, comments on today’s Week In Week Out programme which features a story about neglect by a provider of domiciliary care. 
A home carer was told by her employer to leave a 92 year old woman who had fallen on the floor while she attended her next call, rather than waiting for the ambulance to arrive. 
“We are shocked and saddened to hear about this appalling incident.  
“Having suffered a fall this lady was in an incredibly vulnerable situation and the company appears to have completely breached its duty of care towards her.
“We welcome the actions of the whistle-blower who has brought this matter to public attention and the full circumstances must now be thoroughly investigated.
“Providing quality care takes time. Rushing visits leads to poorer care, negatively impacting on the dignity and potentially the health of the person being supported and demoralising the care worker. 
“The vast majority of care workers are willing and able to provide quality care but the constraints they are facing make it increasingly difficult to do so.
“We know from our local Age Cymru partners that there is a frustration at the lack of time care workers have with each client.
“We would like to see a reliable domiciliary care service, with care staff turning up at the agreed times and staying for a sufficiently long period to ensure that the agreed care plan is carried out.”

Graeme Francis -Age Cymru's Head of Policy, comments on tonight's Week In Week Out programme which will feature the story of a 92-year-old woman who was neglected by the company providing her domiciliary care. 

A home carer was told by her employer to leave a the woman who had fallen on the floor while she attended her next call, rather than waiting for the ambulance to arrive.

“Age Cymru is shocked and saddened to hear about this appalling incident.  

“Having suffered a fall this lady was in an incredibly vulnerable situation and the company appears to have completely breached its duty of care towards her.

“We welcome the actions of the whistle-blower who has brought this matter to public attention and the full circumstances must now be thoroughly investigated.

“Providing quality care takes time.

"Rushing visits leads to poorer care, negatively impacting on the dignity and potentially the health of the person being supported and demoralising the care worker. 

“The vast majority of care workers are willing and able to provide quality care but the constraints they are facing make it increasingly difficult to do so.

“We know from our local Age Cymru partners that there is a frustration at the lack of time care workers have with each client.

“Age Cymru would like to see a reliable domiciliary care service, with care staff turning up at the agreed times and staying for a sufficiently long period to ensure that the agreed care plan is carried out.”

You can read the full story on BBC Wales's website.

For more information: Call Age Cymru Advice: 08000 223 444