Does your councillor deserve an award?

Source : Age UK
Published on 04 December 2012 08:30 AM

Does your councillor deserve an award?

If you know an amazing councillor who has worked hard to listen to older people and improve their neighbourhood then we want to hear from you.

Nominations are now open for the Age UK award which forms part of the LGiU and CCLA C'llr Achievement Awards 2013. This is an award for Councillors who have put older people at the heart of their work, bringing about long lasting change for older people in their communities.

Last year’s winner was Councillor Olwen Foggin of Devon County Council (pictured) who was nominated after her tireless work reinstating a much needed bus route to the local hospital.

Foggin fought the closure of a post box that would have caused older people to walk further to the nearest post office, and also responded to individual concerns raised by older residents.

If you know someone like Councillor Foggin who has used their position to improve your neighbourhood for older people, why not nominate them for this year’s award?

The winning councillor will have a track record of:

  • making time to listen to older people, actively engaging with them and understanding the issues that concern them
  • bringing about changes that directly benefit older people, as a result of those concerns
  • ensuring that any improvements are maintained in the long term and that older people continue to be consulted and involved.

Nominations can be made by members of the public, councillors and council officers, but councillors cannot nominate themselves. You will find everything you need to make a nomination on the opens link in new window LGIU website.

The deadline for applications has been extended to 18 January, and the successful winner will be announced in February at an awards ceremony in London.

Councillors can often be the unsung heroes of our communities. So if you know a councillor who has set an excellent example of helping older people, why not make sure they get the recognition they deserve.

More information about the Age UK Pride of Place Award at the CCLA LGiU C’llr Achievement Awards 2013 can be found at opens link in new window www.lgiu.org.uk/age-uk-award.

 

 

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Age UK experts

  • We have a number of experts available for comment, including:

    Caroline Abrahams

    Caroline Abrahams

    Age UK Director of External Affairs Caroline Abrahams.

    Caroline Abrahams: Charity Director

    Caroline joined Age UK in 2012.

    A social scientist and barrister, Caroline has spent her career in the voluntary and public sectors, mostly on children and families’ issues. She has worked in a senior capacity at the children’s charity, Action For Children and at the Local Government Association. Caroline has also been a policy adviser to Ministers and Shadow Ministers, and a senior civil servant. A former chair of the End Child Poverty campaign, Caroline’s policy interests include integrated health and care, family policy, poverty and the role of the voluntary sector.

    Caroline oversees Age UK’s influencing work and her team covers research, public policy, health influencing, media, campaigns and engagement and public affairs. She is also the Charity's lead spokesperson.

    Caroline decided to work for Age UK because she could see that there was a lot to do to change policy and practice so older people are served well, and because she passionately believes that Age UK can make a big difference.

    Professor James Goodwin

    James Goodwin

    James GoodwinProfessor James Goodwin: Head of Research

    James is head of our research department in Age UK.

    His responsibilities include:

    • funding and commissioning a wide portfolio of research (including social and economic research, and research to improve the health and wellbeing of older people);
    • knowledge management and translation;
    • and all research partnerships, internal and external, including international.

    He has a Visiting Professorship in Ageing at Loughborough University.

    Jane Vass

    Jane Vass

    Jane Vass - Head of Public PolicyJane Vass - Head of Public Policy

    Jane Vass has been Head of Public Policy at Age UK since 2012, having joined Age UK’s predecessor, Age Concern England as Financial Services Policy Adviser in 2006. She was previously an independent consumer consultant specialising in financial services from the consumer viewpoint. In this capacity she undertook research such as reports for the National Consumer Council on equity release and on financial capability for the Securities and Investments Board. She also wrote the Daily Mail Tax Guide for 10 years. She was a member of the Financial Services Consumer Panel from 1999 to 2003, and from 1983 to 1993 she worked for Consumers’ Association.
    Jane was given an OBE for her services to financial services in the June 2015 Birthday Honours list.

    Jane Vass has been Head of Public Policy at Age UK since 2012, having joined Age UK’s predecessor, Age Concern England as Financial Services Policy Adviser in 2006.

    She was previously an independent consumer consultant specialising in financial services from the consumer viewpoint. In this capacity she undertook research such as reports for the National Consumer Council on equity release and on financial capability for the Securities and Investments Board.

    She also wrote the Daily Mail Tax Guide for 10 years. She was a member of the Financial Services Consumer Panel from 1999 to 2003, and from 1983 to 1993 she worked for Consumers’ Association.

    Jane was given an OBE for her services to financial services in the June 2015 Birthday Honours list.

Age UK later life factsheet

  • This factsheet, which is regularly updated, is the most up-to-date source of publicly-available, general information on people in later life in the UK.

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