ONS statistics on Internet use

Source : Age UK
Published on 31 August 2011 09:00 AM

Commenting on statistics released by the ONS about older people using the Internet Helena Herklots, Services Director at Age UK, said:

'Twenty years on from its invention, the Internet is increasingly important to our everyday lives and there are more ways of accessing it than ever, including via a laptop or a mobile phone. The Web can help boost finances and tackle isolation by things like saving money on shopping and keeping in touch with loved ones more easily, so it’s great that over four million older people have used the Internet [1].

'Of course there are still over 5.7 million people in later life who have never been online, which is why Age UK is running itea and biscuits week in September. The week gives older people the chance to learn how to use a range of technology like smart phones and computers through taster sessions run across the country.

'To help more people in later life get online, Age UK is also calling on people who know how to use technology to pass on their knowledge to older friends and family and become an Age UK Digital Champion.

'For more information about itea and biscuits week or getting online call 0800 169 65 65 or if you have access to a computer go to our itea and biscuits web page.'  

- ENDS -

Ref: SMDMGJHH

1. ONS, Internet Access Quarterly Update - 2011 Q2

 

Notes to editors

 

itea and biscuits week

itea and biscuits week is a UK-wide campaign managed and delivered by Age UK in partnership with Age Scotland, Age Cymru and Age NI. itea and biscuits week is part of Connect with IT, a comprehensive digital inclusion campaign managed by Age UK involving myfriends online week, Internet Champion of the Year competition and IT Volunteering. More than 200,000 people in later life have been helped to date.

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