When using any of our statistics please reference Age UK London.

Population

There are 2.2 million people aged 50 or over living in London
1
. There
are over 980,000 people aged over 65 and that number is expected to
grow to 1.2 million by 2024 – an increase of 22% in 10 years
2
. There are
130,000 people aged over 85 in London, and that is expected to increase
to 180,000 over 85 by 2024, which is a 38% increase in 10 years
3
. London’s
population, like that of the rest of the UK, is getting older.
Diversity
London’s older population is very diverse; for instance, of London’s nearly 1
million population aged 65+, 22% are from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic
(BAME) communities
4
 while 37% were born outside of the UK
5
. Opening
Doors London estimate there are 100,000 older lesbian, gay, bisexual and
transgender (LGBT) people in London
6
. Older Londoners speak a broad
range of languages and follow a wide variety of faiths and beliefs.
Economic Situation
While many older Londoners do have enough money to live on, many live
in poverty. National statistics in 2015
7
 showed 23% of older people in Inner
London living in poverty after housing costs and 26% living in material
deprivation. Poverty for older people in London as a whole was above the
national average. There are reasons to fear poverty and inequality among
older Londoners may increase.
Contribution of Older Londoners
The 2013 GLA report ‘The Economic Contribution of Older Londoners’
8
found that the paid work of those aged 50+ in London contributed £47
billion annually to London’s economy, which is a huge contribution to the
capital. It also stated that Londoners aged 65+ contributed £6.3 billion
annually to London’s economy through paid work, volunteering, as carers
and looking after grandchildren. It is vital to highlight and celebrate the
contribution made to active communities in the capital.
What can’t be captured by data are the experiences, knowledge,
dynamism and energy that London’s older population brings to the city, all
of which are an invaluable contribution to the capital.

There are 2.2 million people aged 50 or over living in London. There are over 980,000 people aged over 65 and that number is expected to grow to 1.2 million by 2024 – an increase of 22% in 10 years. There are 130,000 people aged over 85 in London, and that is expected to increase to 180,000 over 85 by 2024, which is a 38% increase in 10 years. 

London’s population, like that of the rest of the UK, is getting older.

Diversity

London’s older population is very diverse; for instance, of London’s nearly 1 million population aged 65+, 22% are from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) communities while 37% were born outside of the UK.

Opening Doors London estimate there are 100,000 older lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people in London.

Older Londoners speak a broad range of languages and follow a wide variety of faiths and beliefs.

Economic Situation

While many older Londoners do have enough money to live on, many live in poverty. National statistics in 2015 showed 23% of older people in Inner London living in poverty after housing costs and 26% living in material deprivation. Poverty for older people in London as a whole was above the national average. There are reasons to fear poverty and inequality among older Londoners may increase.

Contribution of Older Londoners

The 2013 GLA report ‘The Economic Contribution of Older Londoners’ found that the paid work of those aged 50+ in London contributed £47billion annually to London’s economy, which is a huge contribution to the capital. It also stated that Londoners aged 65+ contributed £6.3 billion annually to London’s economy through paid work, volunteering, as carers and looking after grandchildren.

It is vital to highlight and celebrate the contribution made to active communities in the capital. What can’t be captured by data are the experiences, knowledge, dynamism and energy that London’s older population brings to the city, all of which are an invaluable contribution to the capital.

London population by borough

Source: Census 2011

London Borough
Population 50+ 
%50+ 
% Female 50+ 
 % Male 50+
Population 65+ 
Barking and Dagenham 43,700  24% 54% 46% 19,200
Barnet 102,700 29% 54% 46% 47,400
Bexley 77,800 34% 54% 46% 47,900
Brent 77,800 25% 52% 48% 32,600
Bromley 108,200 35% 54% 46% 51,900
Camden 53,500 24% 53% 47% 24,100
City of London 2,400 32% 50% 50% 1,000
Croydon 103,500 29% 54% 46% 44,500
Ealing 86,100 25% 53% 46% 36,300
Enfield 86,600 28% 54% 46% 39,000
Greenwich 61,300 24% 53% 47% 26,000
Hackney        44,800 18% 52% 48% 17,300
Hammersmith and Fulham       38,900  21% 54% 46% 16,400
Haringey 55,900 22% 54% 46% 22,500
Harrow 73,900 31% 55% 45% 33,600
Havering      87,000 37% 54%  46% 42,400
Hillingdon     78,000 29% 52% 48% 35,200
Hounslow 64,500 25% 53% 47% 26,900
Islington      43,400 21% 53% 47% 18,100
Kensington and Chelsea 44,700 28% 54% 46% 19,300
Kingston upon Thames 45,800 29% 53% 47% 20,300
Lambeth 59,000 20% 53% 47% 23,100
Lewisham     63,300 23% 54% 56% 26,200
Merton 52,600 26% 54% 46% 23,200
Newham   54,500 18% 53% 47% 20,400
Redbridge 76,400 27% 54% 47% 33,400
Richmond upon Thames 57,100 31% 57% 43% 25,200
Southwark      58,500 20% 56% 44% 22,400
Sutton      60,000 32% 53% 47% 27,300
Tower Hamlets  39,100 15% 51% 49% 15,800
Waltham Forest     61,100 24% 54% 46% 25,600
Wandsworth    63,200 21% 54% 46% 27,100
Westminster    55,100    25% 52% 28% 24,400