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Published on 24 January 2017 12:30 PM

Age Scotland has called for further efforts to be made to ensure all those who are newly diagnosed with dementia can receive early support.
A report today from ISD Scotland showed that an estimated 2 out of 5 new cases of dementia in Scotland in financial year 2014/15 were referred for Post-Diagnostic Support. This follows the Scottish Government’s commitment in April 2013 that all people newly diagnosed with dementia will have a minimum of a year’s worth of post-diagnostic support coordinated by a link worker, including the building of a person-centred support plan.
Today’s report follows the publication of figures in September which showed significant regional variation in delivery of the guarantee. In Greater Glasgow, 75 percent of those eligible received the support, in Lothian, 52 percent, in Grampian 59 percent, and in Tayside 94 percent.
Richard Baker, Age Scotland Early Stage Dementia Policy Officer said:  “Early support and advice for people with dementia is crucial so that they can be helped to manage the condition and plan ahead for the future. That is why the Scottish Government's ground-breaking guarantee to provide a link worker to people with dementia for a year after diagnosis is such an important and welcome initiative.”
“The report today showing that around 2 out of 5 people newly diagnosed with dementia are referred for post-diagnostic support raises the question around why not all those with a new diagnosis were referred. Additionally 27% did not complete their engagement with the year of support from a link worker, and it is important to understand why this is the case and whether this might inform development of the service In the future.”
“It is also important to recognise that these figures are two years old. There may have been progress in delivery over this time and it would be helpful to have more recent data for an indication of what progress is being made towards the guarantee. However we are aware from figures published through Freedom of Information in September that there have been significant regional variations in delivery of the guarantee. It is vital that the Scottish Government’s commitment on a national level is matched by local delivery and is prioritised by local NHS Boards.”

Age Scotland has called for further efforts to be made to ensure all those who are newly diagnosed with dementia can receive early support.

A report today from ISD Scotland showed that an estimated 2 out of 5 new cases of dementia in Scotland in financial year 2014/15 were referred for Post-Diagnostic Support. This follows the Scottish Government’s commitment in April 2013 that all people newly diagnosed with dementia will have a minimum of a year’s worth of post-diagnostic support coordinated by a link worker, including the building of a person-centred support plan.

Today’s report follows the publication of figures in September which showed significant regional variation in delivery of the guarantee. In Greater Glasgow, 75 percent of those eligible received the support, in Lothian, 52 percent, in Grampian 59 percent, and in Tayside 94 percent.

Richard Baker, Age Scotland Early Stage Dementia Policy Officer said:

“Early support and advice for people with dementia is crucial so that they can be helped to manage the condition and plan ahead for the future. That is why the Scottish Government's ground-breaking guarantee to provide a link worker to people with dementia for a year after diagnosis is such an important and welcome initiative.”

“The report today showing that around 2 out of 5 people newly diagnosed with dementia are referred for post-diagnostic support raises the question around why not all those with a new diagnosis were referred. Additionally 27% did not complete their engagement with the year of support from a link worker, and it is important to understand why this is the case and whether this might inform development of the service In the future.”

“It is also important to recognise that these figures are two years old. There may have been progress in delivery over this time and it would be helpful to have more recent data for an indication of what progress is being made towards the guarantee. However we are aware from figures published through Freedom of Information in September that there have been significant regional variations in delivery of the guarantee. It is vital that the Scottish Government’s commitment on a national level is matched by local delivery and is prioritised by local NHS Boards.”

For more information: contact our Early Stage Dementia team on 0333 32 32 400