Antioxidants 'fail to boost memory'

Source : Press Association
Published on 23 March 2012 12:00 PM

A man caring for his wife who suffers from Alzheimer's disease.

Taking antioxidants such as vitamin C and vitamin E on a daily basis does not improve the thinking and memory skills of people with Alzheimer's disease, new research has shown.

US scientists found that in some cases the memory skills of patients participating in the four-month study who were taking antioxidants actually declined faster than those who took placebo pills that contained no vitamins.      

Previous research had suggested that older adults who have a diet rich in antioxidants are less vulnerable to Alzheimer's. However, more rigorous studies, including some patients who had already been diagnosed with the condition, failed to establish a link between antioxidants and improved mental agility.

Dr Ronald Petersen, head of the Mayo Alzheimer's Disease Research Centre in Rochester, Minnesota, said that numerous supplements are being taken by people on the basis of very little scientific justification.

However, he did admit that many researchers in the field still believe that antioxidants could have a role to play in the fight against Alzheimer's and ageing in general, but they are likely to offer little or no benefits once the disease has actually been diagnosed.

Copyright Press Association 2012


 

Your Age UK

Set your location to see what Age UK offers in your local area.

Age UK Advice:
0800 169 6565

What is the Press Association?

  • All non-Age UK articles in the Latest news section are provided by the Press Association

    About the Press Association

    Press Association

    What is the Press Association?

    The Press Association is the UK's leading multimedia news and information provider and supplier of business-to-business media services.

    As home to the national news agency of the UK and Ireland, the Press Association is at the heart of the media industry providing a continuous feed of text, pictures, video and data into newsrooms around the country. 

    Founded in 1868, the Press Association has an unrivalled reputation for providing fast, fair and accurate information.

    The Press Association is also a key supplier to non-media customers, assisting commercial, government and not-for-profit organisations to access information and communicate successfully through the media.

    The Press Association supplies all non-Age UK news articles in the Latest news section.

Age UK experts

  • We have a number of experts available for comment, including:

    Caroline Abrahams

    Caroline Abrahams

    Age UK Director of External Affairs Caroline Abrahams.Caroline Abrahams: Charity Director

    Caroline Abrahams is Age UK’s Charity Director, and has worked predominantly on children and family issues throughout her career.

    She was Director of Policy and Strategy at the children’s charity Action for Children and Chair of the End Child Poverty campaign before joining the Local Government Association.

    She then moved on to become Senior Policy Adviser in the Department for Children, Schools and Families and more recently she has been an adviser to the Shadow Chancellor, Ed Balls.

    Her policy interests include poverty, public service reform and safeguarding.

    Professor James Goodwin

    James Goodwin

    James GoodwinProfessor James Goodwin: Head of Research

    James is head of our research department in Age UK.

    His responsibilities include:

    • funding and commissioning a wide portfolio of research (including social and economic research, and research to improve the health and wellbeing of older people);
    • knowledge management and translation;
    • and all research partnerships, internal and external, including international.

    He has a Visiting Professorship in Ageing at Loughborough University.

    Jane Vass

    Jane Vass

    Jane Vass - Head of Public PolicyJane Vass - Head of Public Policy

    Jane Vass is Head of Public Policy at Age UK. She joined Age Concern England as Financial Services Policy Adviser in 2006.

    She was previously an independent consumer consultant and writer specialising in financial services from the consumer viewpoint.

    In this capacity she undertook research such as reports for the National Consumer Council on equity release and on savings and investments for low-income consumers.

    She was a member of the Financial Services Consumer Panel from 1999 to 2003, and from 1983 to 1993 she worked for Consumers’ Association.

Age UK later life factsheet

  • This factsheet, which is regularly updated, is the most up-to-date source of publicly-available, general information on people in later life in the UK.

    Help with downloads

    Downloads

    What is a download?

    A download is a document (like a research report, a leaflet, or an application form) that can be transferred from our website to your computer. You can download a file, view it on your screen, print it, or save it to your computer.

    What is a PDF?

    PDF stands for ‘portable document format’.

    Most downloads on this website are PDFs. We use this format to ensure that the document looks the same on everyone’s computer (website pages, by contrast, appear differently depending on how people have set their computer up).

    How do I download a PDF?

    Computers use a program called Adobe Acrobat Reader to download PDFs. If you try clicking on a link to download a PDF and it doesn’t work, you will need to install Adobe Acrobat Reader onto your computer.

    How do I install Adobe Acrobat Reader?

    The process is quite straightforward and is free.

    1. Go to http://get.adobe.com/uk/reader/
    2. Click ‘Download’.
    3. Wait for the window to offer you the option to ‘Run’, then choose this option.
    4. Click ‘Next’.
    5. Click ‘Install’
    6. Wait for the window to offer you the option to ‘Finish’, then choose this option.

    How do I change a download?

    PDFs cannot be changed.

    How do I print or save a download?

    Downloads will open on your computer in a new browser window.

    Inside this window (below all your web browser menus), there will be a toolbar with options for you to print or save the document.

    Close the browser window to return to the Age UK website.

    Can my screen reader read PDF downloads?

    We have made every effort to make our PDFs accessible to screen readers. Please ensure that you have downloaded the latest version of Acrobat Reader from the Adobe Reader website to ensure that accessibility options are included in your version of the programme.

    You can use Adobe Reader to read a PDF out loud with the following shortcut keys:

    • Read the document: Shift +Ctrl+Y
    • Read the open page only: Shift +Ctrl+V
    • Read to the end of the document: Shift+Ctrl+B
    • Pause: Shift+Ctrl+C
    • Stop Shift+Ctrl+E

    You can convert a PDF document into a text file for use with other software and hardware such as Braille printers by opening the PDF and choosing ‘Save as text’ from the File menu.

Close window
Display options

Set the appearance of this website so you can read it more easily

Text size

Background/foreground


To see information relating to Northern Ireland, Scotland or Wales set your preference below: