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Common access issues, who is responsible and how to report it.

This resource was initiated by the Older Person’s Steering Group and has been co-produced by members of the Group, the Age Friendly Island team and Island Roads.


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RUBBISH & RECYCLING – WHEELIE BINS AND BAGS

Bins and bags that are put out too early or are left out for long periods can block the pavement for pedestrians and wheelchair users, forcing them into the road or presenting a trip hazard. Bins and bags should be put out after 7pm the night before collection and removed as promptly as possible. Refuse collectors should replace bins and bags carefully so as not to obstruct the pavement or road.

REPORT TO:

Amey Waste - 01983 823777 

Waste and Recycling (iow.gov.uk)


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LITTER ON PAVEMENTS

Litter that has been dropped on the pavement or thrown from vehicles can cause trips and falls. Hazardous waste, including broken glass and needles, pose a serious injury threat.

Island Roads adopt a street cleansing regime, agreed with the Isle of Wight Council. Streets are defined into zones, based on factors such as housing density, traffic use, public usage and the presence of retail premises. A cleansing frequency is then applied to each zone. For example, a residential street will be cleansed less frequently than a main shopping street.

Currently, town centres are manually swept on a daily basis, and esplanade areas are swept weekly during the winter months and daily during the summer months. Residential and rural roads are swept mechanically (using a road sweeper) and manually swept on a varying frequency, according to the intensity of pedestrian use.

REPORT TO:

FixMyStreet (islandroads.com)

info@islandroads.com 

Island Roads - 01983 822440


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OVERFLOWING LITTER BINS

Litter from unemptied street bins or from rubbish dumped next to bins can cause trips, falls and serious injury. Island Roads operate a system of litter bin emptying across the Island, which has been agreed with the Isle of Wight Council as follows:

From October to April, litter bins in town centres are emptied on a daily basis, and three times a week along the esplanades and in residential areas. From May to September, litter bins in town centres and along esplanades are emptied on a daily basis, and in residential areas, three times per week.

Between June and August, when visitor numbers are at their peak, litter bins are emptied in town centres and on esplanades twice a day. 

Island Roads and the Isle of Wight Council are working on a litter campaign to encourage people to dispose of their litter responsibly and to realise that bins have limited capacity. and When a bin is full, litter should not be placed alongside it, but should be placed in an empty bin nearby or taken home and disposed of there.

REPORT TO:

FixMyStreet (islandroads.com)

info@islandroads.com 

Island Roads - 01983 822440


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LITTER IN HEDGES

Litter from unemptied street bins, fly tipping or dropped litter is unsightly and can blow onto pavements, people and hedges.

About 5% of the Island’s hedges are maintained by Island Roads but most are the responsibility of the property owner or landowner.  Other hedges on council-owned land (e.g. parks) are the responsibility of the Isle of Wight Council. Island Roads clear litter from the highway side of all hedges and verges.

REPORT TO:

FixMyStreet (islandroads.com)

info@islandroads.com 

Island Roads - 01983 822440


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LITTER ON THE VERGE

Carelessly discarded litter on highway verges and hedgerows can become more visible when verges and hedgerows have been trimmed by either Island Roads or private landowners. Island Roads is required to provide a fixed number of grass cutting and cleansing visits each year.

Island Roads and the Isle of Wight Council appeal to people to dispose of their litter responsibly and, if litter bins are full, then to take rubbish home with them. The frequency of bin emptying in town centres and tourism locations, such as esplanades, is increased during holiday periods.

REPORT TO:

FixMyStreet (islandroads.com)

info@islandroads.com 

Island Roads - 01983 822440


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LEAF LITTER AND FALLEN BRANCHES

Leaf litter and fallen branches can cause problems during autumn and high winds. They can block gullies, drains and manholes. They can also cause a trip hazard, pavement blockage or potential flooding.

Island Roads deploy additional mechanical and manual sweeping resource between October and December. Locations that experience increased leaf fall are scheduled for regular visits to remove leaf litter and branches.

For further information visit: https://islandroads.com/our-highway-service/environmental-services/gully-cleansing-2/

REPORT TO:

FixMyStreet (islandroads.com)

info@islandroads.com 

Island Roads - 01983 822440


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PARKING ON PAVEMENTS

Blocking the pavement forces pedestrians and wheelchair users into the road or prevents them from completing their journey. Driving on the pavement, partially or fully parking on the pavement and causing an obstruction are all illegal. However, due to inconsistencies in the law, drivers often get away with this, without penalty.

The outcome of Government consultation to define the law and enforcement responsibility is yet to be announced. Three options are being considered:

1: No change                                                                                   

2: Making local authorities responsible for deciding where/when it is permissible and making infringement a civil offence to enforce.                                                                        

3: Prohibiting pavement parking everywhere in England with specific exemptions. This has been in force in London since 1974.

 

REPORT TO:

Isle of Wight Council
Call: 01983 821000                 
Visit: https://www.iow.gov.uk/iwforms/form.aspx?k=rtvacontraventionIsland%20Roads 

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HEDGES, SHRUBS, TREE BRANCHES AND BRAMBLES

Any obstacle jutting out over the pavement can cause an obstruction or hazard to pedestrians and mobile scooter users.

Some hedges are maintained by Island Roads but most are the responsibility of the property owner or landowner. Island Roads issue a letter when protruding hedges, branches etc are causing an obstruction, asking for these to be addressed within a specific timeframe.  If the work is not completed, Island Roads can step in and carry out the work and will then charge the property or landowner accordingly. Island Roads work with the Council, Country Landowners Association, National Farmers Union and local media on a campaign to remind landowners of their responsibilities. Some hedges, shrubs and trees on council-owned land (e.g. parks) are the responsibility of the Isle of Wight Council.

Hedges maintained by Island Roads are cut between November and January the following year (outside of the nesting season).  You can read more about this on our website: https://islandroads.com/our-highway-service/environmental-services/hedge-cutting/

REPORT TO:

FixMyStreet (islandroads.com)

info@islandroads.com 

Island Roads - 01983 822440


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ROADWORKS SIGNAGE

Roadwork signs are installed to inform road users of planned roadworks or improvements. They are put out by both contractors working on behalf of Island Roads and by Utility companies carrying out their own works.  Sign locations should balance the need to inform highway users and to ensure footways are not blocked or made hazardous. If signs are thought to be dangerous or obstructive, they should be reported to Island Roads.

REPORT TO:

FixMyStreet (islandroads.com)

info@islandroads.com 

Island Roads - 01983 822440


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SKIPS, SCAFFOLDING AND HOARDINGS

Scaffolding, builders’ skips and temporary hoardings all require a permit if they are to be placed on the highway. This is a requirement of the Highways Act 1980. If works cause a hazard to pedestrians and mobile scooter users, please report to Island Roads.

Further info: https://islandroads.com/our-highway-service/managing-the-roads/skip-and-scaffolding-licences/

REPORT TO:

FixMyStreet (islandroads.com)

info@islandroads.com 

Island Roads - 01983 822440


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ADVERTISING BOARDS OUTSIDE SHOPS AND BUSINESSES

Swing signs, A-frames, sandwich boards etc can block the pavement and cause a trip hazard especially for the blind or partially sighted, wheelchair and pushchair users. Businesses pay a fee to the Isle of Wight Council, on condition that the boards do not block the pavements.

REPORT TO:

Isle of Wight Council - Email: licensing@iow.gov.uk   
Visit: https://www.iow.gov.uk/Business/Licensing/Licence-Street-Trading/Street-Furniture1

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CAFÉ TABLES, CHAIRS AND PATIO HEATERS

When placed outside catering establishments on wide pavements or squares, furniture can obstruct passage or cause a hazard, especially to people with sight impairment, wheelchair and pushchair users. Any items placed on the pavement should be licensed by the Isle of Wight Council. 

Visit for further info: https://www.iow.gov.uk/azservices/documents/1485-IWC-Highways-Permissions-Policy.pdf

REPORT TO:

Isle of Wight Council - Email: licensing@iow.gov.uk   
Visit: https://www.iow.gov.uk/Business/Licensing/Licence-Street-Trading/Street-Furniture1

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BROKEN OR DAMAGED PAVEMENT SURFACE

Cracked paving slabs, broken-up tarmac or any other surface problem can cause a trip hazard. Island Roads are currently carrying out a programme of footway (pavement) resurfacing across the Island. Some of this work has, however,been subject to delays in order to accommodate work by WightFibre as they roll out Superfast Broadband across the Island. It makes sense to wait for these works to be completed rather than digging up newly-laid surfacing. Footways are inspected and maintained all year-round, and any necessary repairs completed. Utilities that carry out works on pavements are required to reinstate the surface to the required standard after works.

REPORT TO:

FixMyStreet (islandroads.com)

info@islandroads.com 

Island Roads - 01983 822440


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STREET SIGNAGE, LAMP POSTS AND LIGHT COLUMNS

Reflectivity of signs is crucial to help prevent accidents involving pedestrians on road crossings and junctions. Island Roads conduct an annual test of reflectivity of signs as part of their inspections process, and they have a cleaning schedule. Since 2013, Island Roads have been working to enhance or replace all the 12,068 streetlights across the Island, to make the lighting brighter and require less maintenance. The lights have been replaced on a like-for-like basis with energy-efficient LED lamps that reduce light pollution, are more reliable and efficient.                

For further information about signs reflectivity testing, visit: islandroads.com/road-sign-visibility-put-to-the-test-on-island-roads-to-improve-road-safety/

For further information about signs cleaning visit: islandroads.com/our-highway-service/environmental-services/signs-cleaning/   

REPORT TO:

FixMyStreet (islandroads.com)

info@islandroads.com 

Island Roads - 01983 822440


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UTILITY, MANHOLE AND GULLY COVERS

Covers can become broken, lifted, loose or missing on pavements or roads, which can be potentially life threatening. Utilities that carry out works on pavements are required to reinstate the surface to the required standard after works.   

Island Roads carry out a maintenance programme and a programme of inspections all year round.  Any defects to ironworks, such as manhole and gully covers, are rectified where these are identified.  Utility companies are responsible for their own apparatus.   

 REPORT TO:

FixMyStreet (islandroads.com)

info@islandroads.com 

Island Roads - 01983 822440


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INSTALLATION OF TACTILE SURFACES

Bumpy surfaces are designed to warn those with sight impairment that they are on the edge of a road crossing. Lack of tactile surfaces can present a challenge and hazard for those with sight impairment.

Island Roads and the Isle of Wight Council have been working in partnership to carry out a programme to install accessible pavements with tactile surfaces across the Island. Any new requests have to be agreed by the Isle of Wight Council.

For further information, visit: https://islandroads.com/work-paves-the-way-for-improved-pedestrian-access/

REPORT TO:

FixMyStreet (islandroads.com)

info@islandroads.com 

Island Roads - 01983 822440


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DROPPED KERBS

Dropped kerbs provide safer road crossings, by removing the risk of trips and falls. It’s easier for wheelchairs and scooters to cross roads and for vehicle access onto driveways. Vehicles driving across the pavement need to do so slowly and safely.

If a dropped kerb already exists, Island Roads is responsible for its maintenance.  Requests for new dropped kerbs can be made, but Island Roads have to submit these requests, as part of the Highways Safety & Improvement Register, to the Isle of Wight Council, who will then decide which requests will be implemented

REPORT TO:

FixMyStreet (islandroads.com)

info@islandroads.com 

Island Roads - 01983 822440


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SITING OF STREET FURNITURE (LITTER BINS, BENCHES, BOLLARDS)

Benches are particularly important for those with mobility issues. Bins and bollards need to be sited in appropriate and useful locations. Where poorly sited, they cause a hazard or obstruction to pavement users, especially those with visual impairment.

Island Roads is responsible for existing street furniture on the public highway, including its maintenance.  A small number of other benches are the responsibility of town and parish councils or individuals, where they are on private or publicly owned land.  Requests for new items of street furniture can be made, but Island Roads have to submit these requests, as part of the Highways Safety & Improvement Register, to the Isle of Wight Council who will then decide which requests will be implemented. 

For further information, visit: https://islandroads.com/hundreds-of-new-traffic-bollards-installed/

REPORT TO:

FixMyStreet (islandroads.com)

info@islandroads.com 

Island Roads - 01983 822440


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SITING OF PLANTERS ON PAVEMENTS

Planters, pots or other decorative items are sometimes placed on the pavement. This can restrict access and present a challenge and hazard for those with a sight impairment or mobility issue.

Island Roads and the Isle of Wight Council work to ensure the highways network is safe and accessible to all users. Island Roads approach property owners directly for people to take action themselves, in the first instance, but anything considered a hazard can be removed, if owners refuse to comply.

REPORT TO:

FixMyStreet (islandroads.com)

info@islandroads.com 

Island Roads - 01983 822440