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Excess Winter Deaths

Published on 28 November 2014 01:00 PM

 

AGE UK URGES GOVERNMENT NOT TO BE COMPLACENT AS FEWER EXCESS WINTER DEATH FIGURES REPORTED DUE TO MILD CONDITIONS LAST WINTER
 
Charity warns that urgent action is needed to prevent tens of thousands dying unnecessarily every year because of cold homes
New figures released by the ONS today show that there were 18,200 excess winter deaths last year from cold-related illness such as heart attacks and strokes.
 
Although the overall number of deaths has gone down from the previous winter, the vast majority of these deaths were among older people, with a deeply troubling 15,900 in the over-65 age group.  Over the last ten years a staggering quarter of a million older people have died from the cold -1 older person every 7 minutes. Also the average winter temperature was nearly double last year.
  
Responding to the figures, Age UK's Charity Director, Caroline Abrahams, said: 
 
"It is truly shocking that thousands of older people are dying unnecessarily every winter because they cannot afford to keep warm. This is a national disgrace and a damning indictment of our failure to tackle the root cause of the problem: cold, energy-inefficient homes.
"Fewer older people died last year compared to recent years but the winter was exceptionally mild: we must not be complacent about the cold homes which cause so many deaths among older people because who knows how bad this and future winters will be.
 
"The sad fact is that many of these deaths could have been prevented. Cold homes, caused by a number of factors including poor insulation and high energy costs, are a major cause of excess winter deaths. 
 
"In the short term we would urge all older people to claim the benefits they're entitled to so they can afford to turn the heating up and stay warm. 
 
"However the only long-term solution to this problem is an ambitious government-led programme to bring all our housing up to a high energy efficiency standard. We realise a national infrastructure project of this scale would require major investment but not only would it reduce illness and deaths among older people, it would also cut associated costs to the NHS, create jobs and growth and help future generations. 
 
"We are urging the Chancellor to address this in his upcoming Autumn Statement."
 
Through its Spread the Warmth campaign, Age UK will be doing everything it can to help older people keep warm this winter. Age UK offers information and advice 365 days a year and older people and their families can call Age UK Advice free on 0800 169 65 65. 
 
Age UK is also calling on the Government to support a major energy efficiency programme which will enable all older people to live in a warm home in a bid to tackle the high levels of excess winter deaths and fuel poverty amongst older people. 
 
The Charity is calling on people to help reduce the number of unnecessary deaths this winter by joining its campaign for warm homes or by making a donation. To donate as little as £5, or to find out more about how you can make a difference to our work visit www.spreadthewarmth.org.uk, call 0800 169 87 87.
 
Age UK is part of the Energy Bill Revolution, an alliance with over one hundred members, including Age UK, campaigning for warm homes and lower bills. For further information, please visit www.energybillrevolution.org.
 
-Ends-
 
Ref: LFMKAWHSCASK
 
Notes to editors
 
Age UK's advice to older people this winter
The charity recommends the following actions which older people can take to protect their health in cold weather:
 
•         Stay active and when you are indoors try not to sit still for more than an hour, if you can get up and walk around or make a hot drink.
 
•         Eat well. It's important to eat well, especially in the winter. Have at least one hot meal a day and regular hot drinks, as they to help to keep you warm. Also stock up on basic food items in case of a cold snap.
 
•         Keep warm at home. Keeping warm is vital for your health so aim to heat your living area to 70F (21C) and your bedroom to at least 65F (18C); being cold can increase the risk of heart attacks, strokes and breathing difficulties. You should also close your bedroom window at night.
 
•         Keep your hands, face and feet warm. Also remember that, several layers will keep you warmer than one thick layer as layers trap warm air. Wool or fleecy, synthetic fibres will keep you warmest.
 

Age UK urges government not to be complacent as fewer excess winter death figures reported due to mild conditions last winter

Charity warns that urgent action is needed to prevent tens of thousands dying unnecessarily every year because of cold homes

 

New figures released by the ONS today show that there were 18,200 excess winter deaths last year from cold-related illness such as heart attacks and strokes. 

Although the overall number of deaths has gone down from the previous winter, the vast majority of these deaths were among older people, with a deeply troubling 15,900 in the over-65 age group.  Over the last ten years a staggering quarter of a million older people have died from the cold -1 older person every 7 minutes. Also the average winter temperature was nearly double last year. 

Responding to the figures, Age UK's Charity Director, Caroline Abrahams, said:  'It is truly shocking that thousands of older people are dying unnecessarily every winter because they cannot afford to keep warm. This is a national disgrace and a damning indictment of our failure to tackle the root cause of the problem: cold, energy-inefficient homes.

'Fewer older people died last year compared to recent years but the winter was exceptionally mild: we must not be complacent about the cold homes which cause so many deaths among older people because who knows how bad this and future winters will be.

'The sad fact is that many of these deaths could have been prevented. Cold homes, caused by a number of factors including poor insulation and high energy costs, are a major cause of excess winter deaths.  

'In the short term we would urge all older people to claim the benefits they're entitled to so they can afford to turn the heating up and stay warm.  

'However the only long-term solution to this problem is an ambitious government-led programme to bring all our housing up to a high energy efficiency standard. We realise a national infrastructure project of this scale would require major investment but not only would it reduce illness and deaths among older people, it would also cut associated costs to the NHS, create jobs and growth and help future generations.  

'We are urging the Chancellor to address this in his upcoming Autumn Statement.'

Through its Spread the Warmth campaign, Age UK will be doing everything it can to help older people keep warm this winter.

Age UK offers information and advice 365 days a year and older people and their families can call Age UK Advice free on 0800 169 65 65.  Age UK is also calling on the Government to support a major energy efficiency programme which will enable all older people to live in a warm home in a bid to tackle the high levels of excess winter deaths and fuel poverty amongst older people.  

The Charity is calling on people to help reduce the number of unnecessary deaths this winter by joining its campaign for warm homes or by making a donation. To donate as little as £5, or to find out more about how you can make a difference to our work visit www.spreadthewarmth.org.uk, call 0800 169 87 87. 

Age UK is part of the Energy Bill Revolution, an alliance with over one hundred members, including Age UK, campaigning for warm homes and lower bills. For further information, please visit http://www.energybillrevolution.org/.

 -Ends- 

Ref: LFMKAWHSCASK 

Notes to editors 

Age UK's advice to older people this winterThe charity recommends the following actions which older people can take to protect their health in cold weather: 

•  Stay active and when you are indoors try not to sit still for more than an hour, if you can get up and walk around or make a hot drink. 

•   Eat well. It's important to eat well, especially in the winter. Have at least one hot meal a day and regular hot drinks, as they to help to keep you warm. Also stock up on basic food items in case of a cold snap.

•   Keep warm at home. Keeping warm is vital for your health so aim to heat your living area to 70F (21C) and your bedroom to at least 65F (18C); being cold can increase the risk of heart attacks, strokes and breathing difficulties. You should also close your bedroom window at night. 

•    Keep your hands, face and feet warm. Also remember that, several layers will keep you warmer than one thick layer as layers trap warm air. Wool or fleecy, synthetic fibres will keep you warmest. 

Media Contact: Helen Spinney

Telephone: 020 3033 1430

Email: helen.spinney@ageuk.org.uk

Out-of-hours: 07071 243 243


Last updated: Oct 06 2017

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