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Dementia

Dementia is a progressive disorder that affects how your brain works and in particular the ability to remember, think and reason. It is not a disease in itself – but a group of symptoms that may accompany a number of diseases that can affect the brain.

Dementia is not a consequence of growing old but the risk of having dementia increases with age. Most people who are affected by dementia are over 65, but there are many people younger than this.

Caring and dementia

Information about what care and support may be available to you, as a carer of a dementia patient.

Types of dementia

The most common (and well-known) type of dementia is Alzheimer's disease. Another is vascular dementia which can develop following a stroke or mini stroke, or if there is blood vessel damage that interrupts the flow of blood to your brain.

Other types of dementia include – dementia with Lewy bodies and frontotemporal dementia.

In 2014, of the estimated that 850,000 people who were living with dementia in the UK, 773,502 were aged 65 and over.

Further options

There are things you can do, if you discover that you or a relative has dementia. 

Your GP should be the first port of call, who can refer you to a specialist if you wish and with whom you can discuss the symptoms and possible treatments. 

Find out more about treatment options

If you have dementia, there are also changes you can make to your day-to-day life, to make it easier to cope with. Not everyone has the same difficulties, and everyone experiences them in their own way.

Understand how to live well with dementia

You might also want to consider the future. It may help you to plan finances and legal affairs, so you can be confident that they will be carried out as you wish.

Planning for the future with dementia

Speak to someone at your local Age UK for face-to-face help and support.

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For more information call Age UK on 0800 055 6112

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